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25 December 2017

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Koko Crater Christmas morning.

Koko Crater Christmas morning.

Daniel, Cindy, Alex, Anna, Nancy

Daniel, Cindy, Alex, Anna, Nancy

Nancy volunteered for the Chinaman's Hat photo.

Nancy volunteered for the Chinaman’s Hat photo.

The Giant Turtle and the Momma Elephant with the baby elephant following behind her.

The Giant Turtle and the Momma Elephant with the baby elephant following behind her.

Hawaiian Monk Seal

Hawaiian Monk Seal

Hawaiian Monk Seal on the beach.

Hawaiian Monk Seal on the beach.

A surfer getting barreled at Sunset Beach.

A surfer getting barreled at Sunset Beach.

The girls on the beach at Sunset Beach.

The girls on the beach at Sunset Beach.

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Mom and daughters on the beach at Sunset Beach

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Surfer at Rocky Point

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Surfer getting barreled at Rocky Point

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Surfer at Rocky Point

GoPro video of snorkeling with a turtle at Turtle Bay
https://youtu.be/LpZekShAwkw

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Brittle stars or ophiuroids are echinoderms in the class Ophiuroidea closely related to starfish. They crawl across the sea floor using their flexible arms for locomotion. The ophiuroids generally have five long, slender, whip-like arms which may reach up to 60 cm (24 in) in length on the largest specimens. They are also known as serpent stars.

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The yellowspotted trevally, yellowspotted kingfish, goldspotted trevally, or tarrum, Carangoides fulvoguttatus, is a widespread species of large inshore marine fish in the jack family Carangidae. The yellowspotted trevally inhabits the tropical and subtropical waters of the western Indo-Pacific region, from South Africa in the west to Japan and Australia in the east. The species is known to grow to a maximum length of at least 1.2 m, and is distinguished by gill raker and fin morphology, as well as the distinctive golden spots which give the fish its name. The yellowspotted trevally generally prefers inshore rocky and coral reefs, but is occasionally found over deep offshore sand banks to a depth of 100 m. It is a predatory fish, taking fish, cephalopods, and crustaceans, and shows diet partitioning with other trevallies in studies conducted in Australian waters.

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Anna & the Turtle